New Directions in Analyzing Text as Data Workshop (2013)

New Directions in Analyzing Text as Data Workshop (2013)

Schedule: Version 26 September  2013

London School of Economics and Political Science
Friday, September 27, 2012, 8:30 – Saturday, September 28, 2012, 17:00
For registered participants only

Venue: New Academic Building, Lincoln’s Inn Fields, lower level room NAB.LG.03

Part of an annual event jointly sponsored by the Institute for Quantitative Social Science at Harvard University and the Ford Center for Global Citizenship at Northwestern University, this year’s event will take place in London, hosted by the Department of Methodology of the LSE.  These conferences are co-organized by Ken Benoit (PI on the QUANTESS [Quantitative Analysis of Textual Data for Social Sciences] project at LSE), Daniel Diermeier (two previous conferences at Kellogg), and Arthur Spirling (“New Directions in Text Analysis” at Harvard).  Last year this conference took place at Harvard, and next year is scheduled to take place at Kellogg.

FRIDAY

**BREAKFAST**, COFFEE AND REGISTRATION (Friday, 8:30-9:00)

OPENING REMARKS: Ken Benoit (9:00-9:15)

1) POLICY ANALYSIS FROM TEXTUAL DATA (9:15-10:45AM)

  1. Scaling Politically Meaningful Dimensions Using Texts and Votes,” Benjamin Lauderdale.
  2. The Evolution of the Security Dilemma in US-China Relations,” Erin Baggott.

Discussants: Justin Gross and Will Lowe

COFFEE BREAK (10:45-11:00AM)

2) EFFECTS FROM TEXTS (11:00-12:30PM)

  1. Judicial Identity and the Written Word: Evidence From Causal Text Analysis,” Michael Gill and Andrew B. Hall.
  2. Analysis of Causal Topics in Text Data and Time Series with Applications to Presidential Prediction Markets,” Hyun Duk Kim, ChengXiang Zhai, Thomas A. Rietz, Daniel Diermeier, Meichun Hsu, Malu Castellanos, and Carlos Ceja.

Discussants: Andrew Martin and Kevin Quinn

LUNCH (12:30-1:30PM)

3) NEW APPLICATIONS FOR OLD SCHOOL QUANTITATIVE CORPUS LINGUISTICS APPROACHES (1:30-3:00PM)

  1. Towards the automated measurement of deliberative communication.” Valentin Gold and Katharina Holzinger
  2. UK Press Portrayal of Migrant Groups: A Public-Facing Application of Quantitative Corpus Linguistic Analysis to Newspaper Texts,” (and more about the overall project hereScott Blinder and William Allen.

Discussants: Benjamin Lauderdale and Philip Resnik

COFFEE BREAK (3:00-3:30PM)

4) TRICK, OR TWEET? (3:30-5:00PM)

  1. Evolution of Political Discussion on Twitter – Ideology, Issues, and Events”, Pablo Barbara, Rich Bonneau, John Jost, Jonathan Nagler, Josh Tucker
  2. Predicting and Interpolating State-level polling using Twitter textual data”, Nick Beauchamp

Discussants: Andy Eggers and Noah Smith  

19:00-21:30 Participant Dinner (by invitation)

SATURDAY

COFFEE (Saturday, 9:00-9:30AM)

5) MEDIA FRENZY (Saturday, 9:30-11:00AM)

  1. Taking Out the Trash: An Empirical Investigation of Strategic Timing of News Releases.” Greg Austin and Joseph Walsh.
  2. News Media: platform or power broker?  A study of political quotes in newspaper content using syntactic analysis.” Wouter van Atteveldt.

Discussants: Arthur Spirling and Cheryl Schonhardt-Bailey

MORE COFFEE (11:00-11:15AM)

6) NAMED, FRAMED, AND TAMED (11:15-12:45)

  1. Identifying Media Frames and Frame Dynamics within and across Policy Issues,” Amber E. Boydstun, Justin H. Gross, Philip Resnik, Noah A. Smith
  2. Signals of Doubt: Harnessing the Power of Text-Mining to Understand Media Coverage of Climate Change,” Constantine Boussalis

Discussants: Paul Kellstedt and Justin Farrell.

LUNCH (12:45-13:30PM)

7) AND NOW FOR SOME COMPUTER SCIENCE APPROACHES (13:30-15:00)

  1. Measuring Ideological Proportions in Political Speeches,” Yanchuan Sim, Brice D. L. Acree, Justin Gross, and Noah A. Smith. (And a political science version of this paper available here.)
  2.  “Tracing the Flow of Policy Ideas in Legislatures: A Computational Approach,” John Wilkerson, David Smith, Nick Stramp, Jeremy Dashiell. John will also briefly describe the Poliinformatics project.

Discussants: Hanna Wallach and Ken Younge

COFFEE BREAK (15:00-15:15)

8) TOOLS AND METHODS ROUNDTABLE (15:15-17:00PM)

  1. Structural topic models for open-ended survey responses,” Brandon M. Stewart.
  2. Policy Miner: From Oysters to Pearls”, Hossein Rahmani and Christine Arnold.
  3. Corpus-Based Dictionaries for Sentiment Analysis of Specialized Vocabularies,” Doug Rice and Christopher Zorn.
  4. PiCloud: A Simple Approach to Cloud Computing,” Ken Younge.

(General audience reaction will replace discussants for this session.)

FOLLOWED BY DISCUSSIONS AT THE PUB


FULL LIST OF PARTICIPANTS

Name Department/Institution
Amber E. Boydstun Department of Political Science, University of California, Davis
Aude Bicquelet Department of Methodology, LSE
Andrew Hall Department of Govenment, Harvard University
Andrew Martin Center for Empirical Research in the Law, Washington University
Andy Eggers Department of Government, London School of Economics
Arthur Spirling Department of Government, Harvard University
Ben Lauderdale Department of Methodology, London School of Economics
Brandon M. Stewart Department of Government, Harvard University
Cheryl Schonhardt-Bailey Department of Government, London School of Economics
Chris Zorn School of Law, Pennsylvania State University
Christine Arnold Department of Political Science, University of Maastricht
Constantine Boussalis Harvard Law School
Daniel Diermeier Kellogg School of Management, Northwestern University
Derek Thomson Civil and Building Engineering, Loughborough University
Derek William Vallès Department of Government, London School of Economics
Ekaterina Kolpinskaya Law and Social Sciences, Nottingham University
Erin Baggott Department of Government, Harvard University
Hanna Wallach School of Computer Science, University of Massachussets
Jack Blumenau Department of Government, London School of Economics
Jin Jian Department of Methodology, London School of Economics
John Gasper Carnegie Mellon University
John Wilkerson Political Science Department, University of Washington
Jonathan Nagler Department of Politics, New York University
Joseph Walsh Department of Political Science, University of Alabama
Joshua Tucker Department of Politics, New York University
Justin Farrell Yale University
Justin Gross Political Science Department, University of Washington
Katherina Holzinger Chair of International Relations and Conflict Management, Konstanz University
Ken Benoit Department of Methodology, London School of Economics
Ken Younge Krannert School of Management, Purdue University
Kenneth Cukier Data Editor, The Economist
Kevin Quinn School of Law, UC Berkeley
Laura Morales Department of Politics and International Relations, University of Leicester
Michael Gill Department of Government, Harvard University
Monica Poletti University of Milan
Nick Beauchamp Department of Political Science, Northeastern University
Nina Wiesehomeier Department of Political and Cultural Studies at Swansea University
Noah Smith School of Computer Science, Carnegie Mellon University
Pablo Barbera Department of Politics at New York University
Paul Kellstedt Political Science Department, Texas A&M University
Paul Nulty Department of Methodology, London School of Economics
Philip Resnik University of Maryland Institute for Advanced Computer Studies (UMIACS)
Raymond Duch Department of Politics and International Relations, Oxford University
Scott Blinder Compas, Oxford University
Stefano Pagliari London School of Economics
Thomas Daubler MZES, University of Mannheim
Travis Coan Harvard Law School
Trevor A Cohn Computer Science, Sheffield University
Valentin Gold Chair of International Relations and Conflict Management, Konstanz University
Will Lowe MZES, University of Mannheim
William Allen Compas, Oxford University
Wouter Van Atteveldt Communication Science Department, VU University of Amsterdam

 


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